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BHMD - LITTLE ROCK NINE

The Little Rock Nine were a group of nine black students who enrolled at formerly all-white Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas, in September 1957. The nine Black students attendance at the school was a test of Brown v. Board of Education, a landmark 1954 Supreme Court ruling that declared segregation in public schools unconstitutional. 


On September 4, 1957, the first day of classes at Central High, Governor Orval Faubus called in the Arkansas National Guard to block the black students’ entry into the high school. Later that month, President Dwight D. Eisenhower sent in federal troops to escort the Little Rock Nine into the school. It drew national attention to the early civil rights movement.

BHMD PODCAST EPISODE 107

Neema Barnette presents BHMD Podcast premieres a new episode hosted by Whole Body Literacy & Education (WHBLE) founder, Ah-Keisha McCants. Her guest will be Spirit Tawfiq, founder of Roots of the Spirit, an organization created to-uproot racism through Storytelling, Education and the Arts. Spirit is the creator and host of Roots of the Spirit Podcast, a space to galvanize change through honest conversations about identity, “race,” racism and intersecting social justice issues.



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BHMD’s FIRST FULL LENGTH DOCUMENTARY:

"KING OF STAGE, THE WOODIE KING JR. STORY"

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William Grant Still (May 11, 1895 – December 3, 1978) was a Black composer of more than 150 works, including five symphonies and eight operas.


Often referred to as "the Dean" of American composers, Still was the first American composer of any race to have an opera produced by the New York City Opera. Still is known most for his first symphony, the "Afro-American", which was until the 1950s the most widely performed symphony composed by an American.


Born in Mississippi, he grew up in Little Rock, Arkansas, attended Wilberforce University and Oberlin Conservatory of Music, and was a student of George Whitefield Chadwick and later Edgard Varèse.


Still was the first African American to conduct a major American symphony orchestra, the first to have his 1st Symphony performed by a leading orchestra, the first to have an opera performed by a major opera company, and the first to have an opera performed on national television.


Due to his close association and collaboration with prominent Afro-American literary and cultural figures such as Alain Locke and Langston Hughes, William Grant Still is considered to be part of the Harlem Renaissance movement. 

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We are proud to announce that Black History Mini Docs’ documentary "King Of Stage: The Woodie King Jr. Story" is a winner at the Pan African Film Festival and the San Francisco Black Film Festival.

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